The little things are often the greatest things.

For the first time in a week, we’ve been out into the world to simply go on an adventure. We left our little Hobbit Hole of a home behind and made the most of the autumnal sunshine as we visited our local park. I had wanted to go on Remembrance Sunday but sadly, with the smallest Button being under the weather I didn’t make it — so we visited the new statue today.

He’s at the stage now where he is taking absolutely everything in. Like a tiny little human shaped sponge, he was watching a little girl on the other swing going much higher than he was and didn’t take his eyes off of her. Please don’t wish away your smallest days, little boy! Before I know it, you won’t be needing me to push you at all, and I want to savour it.

He’s wearing some of my most beloved baby clothes, today — clothes that my Nanna has knit. Every stitch of his hat and jumper is laced with absolute love, and I think he knows it. She’s knit him jumpers and hats since he was in my belly, even creating tiny little mitts and booties for him. I hold no shame in admitting that I have a few pieces tucked away to keep forever, in his memory box.. When clothing is handmade, it means so much. I made sure to pay it forward and took all the clothing I didn’t feel too precious over to the community centre towards the end of summer, so that any winter newborns were well cared for in my Nanna’s stitches.

We played in the leaves for a while, finding those which were extra crispy and crunchy or those which took his interest before going to find the statue of Private Norman Harvey, which is new to the park. Commemorating 100 years since Norman was awarded the Victoria Cross, it was unveiled a few weeks ago during October and it’s breathtaking — even more poignant was how we saw him today. People had paid tribute to Norman by leaving their poppy with him and notes of thanks. The St Helen’s Star sheds light on just why people are so keen to pay their respects to the Private:

Norman’s award recognised his actions in Ingoyhem, Belgium. When his battalion was held up and suffering severe casualties from machine-gun fire, he ran forward and engaged the enemy single-handed, killing two, wounding one and capturing 12 men and two guns. He later used a hidden machine-gun to put the enemy to flight. When night fell, he went out alone and gathered important information. Throughout these actions, Norman was limping as he had a sprained ankle.

2m high statue to be unveiled in honour of VC winner Norman Harvey at Mesnes Park” in the St Helen’s Star, October 2018

I’d say he looks good in red, wouldn’t you agree?

It’s a stunning statue, and creates an imposing sight when you see him from the main pathway in the park. A bench has been placed right in front of him too, for those who feel the need to contemplate around him. He’s incredibly popular at the moment, while I was there with Baby Button a group of teenagers were with an adult discussing the ages of those who found themselves at war. Moments after they had moved away, still discussing the topic, a lady and her dog arrived and posed. He’s become a very well loved member of the community, and that’s well deserved. Lest we forget.

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